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Communication Ethics Literacy: Dialogue and Difference

Author(s): Ronald C. Arnett, Leeanne McManus, Janie Fritz

Edition: 2

Copyright: 2018

Pages: 320

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Communication ethics is imperative in the 21st century as the prevalence of conflicting opinions endangers successful, respectful communication.

Utilizing a dialogic approach to ethical communication, Communication Ethics Literacy: Dialogue and Difference provides a timely review of classic communication ethics literature and extends the conversation about dialogue and difference in public and private life. Understanding communication ethics as a pragmatic survival skill in a world of difference, this work frames communication ethics as a discipline and practice that arises from multiple understandings of goods found across diverse narratives, traditions, and virtue structures that guide human life.

Communication Ethics Literacy: Dialogue and Difference

  • Presents “The Dialogic Learning Model” as a framework offering guidelines for ethical decision making in several communicative contexts, such as interpersonal, intercultural, and organizational settings.
  • Examines communication ethics in varied arenas, such as health care settings, businesses, the electronic/digital realm, and more.
  • Applies theory to everyday life with examples drawn from multiple perspectives in personal and professional life. Incorporates Victor Hugo’s Les Misérables to further illustrate principles in each chapter and examine the ethical struggles that constitute the human condition.

Preface

The Pragmatic

A Minimalist Era

A Narrow Ridge

Communication Ethics Praxis in an Era of Difference

Acknowledgments

About the Authors

Chapter 1 Communication Ethics: A Pragmatic Necessity
Introduction
Student Application: Contending Goods
The Good
Protection and Promotion of Goods: On Our Watch
Communicative Absence
From Unreflective Communication Ethics Practices to Literacy
Multiplicity of Goods
Historical Moment: Mapping Communication Ethics
Postmodernity
Postmodernity and Communication Ethics
Postmodernity and the Rhetorical Turn
Finding Common Centers in Postmodernity
Learning
Communication Ethics: Reflection and Action
Engaging Communication Ethics through Literature: Les Misérables

Chapter 2 Communication Ethics: History and Definitions
Introduction
Student Application: Finding Narrative Ground
Multiplicity of Communication Ethics
History of Communication Ethics
Defining Communication Ethics Across the Discipline
Situating Our Definition of Communication Ethics
Philosophy of Communication
Applied Communication
Narrative
Rhetorical Functions of Narrative
Competing Narratives
Communication Ethics: Reflection and Action
Engaging Communication Ethics through Literature: Les Misérables

Chapter 3 Approaches to Communication Ethics: The Pragmatic Good of Theory
Introduction
Student Application: Choice Making
Democratic Communication Ethics
Universal-Humanitarian Communication Ethics
Codes, Procedures, and Standards in Communication Ethics
Contextual Communication Ethics
Narrative Communication Ethics
Dialogic Communication Ethics
Standpoint Communication Ethics
The College Campus: Communication Ethics Perspectives
Communication Ethics: Reflection and Action
Engaging Communication Ethics through Literature: Les Misérables

Chapter 4 Communication Ethics: In the Eye(s) of the Theory of the Beholder
Introduction
Student Application: Common Sense and Contention
Common Sense
Common Sense: Losing the Common
Common Sense as Communicative Practices
A Patchwork Quilt of Common Sense
Learning
Theories
In the Eye(s) of the Theory
Theories as Public Memory
Theory as Story-Laden Communication Ethics
Communication Ethics: Reflection and Action
Engaging Communication Ethics through Literature: Les Misérables

Chapter 5 Dialogic Ethics: Meeting Differing Grounds of the “Good”
Introduction
Student Application: Negotiating Difference
Dialogue and Difference
The Content of Dialogue
Dialogic Theory
Martin Buber
Hans-Georg Gadamer
Paulo Freire
Hannah Arendt
Dialogic Coordinates: Without Demand
A Dialogic Learning Model of Communication Ethics
Communication Ethics: Reflection and Action
Engaging Communication Ethics through Literature: Les Misérables

Chapter 6 Public Discourse Ethics: Public and Private Accountability
Introduction
Student Application: What is Public and Private Space?
Public Discourse: The Public “Good”
Public Decision Making: The Good of Public Accountability
Eclipsing the Ethical: Undue Confidence and Unsubstantiated Opinion
Differentiaion of Public and Private Space
Resisting an Invasion of Banality—Protecting Difference
The Public as Sacred Space
Protecting the Voices of the Unseen and the Unheard
Reclaiming the Public Arena
Pointing to a Dialogic Ethic in Public Discourse
Communication Ethics: Reflection and Action
Engaging Communication Ethics through Literature: Les Misérables

Chapter 7 Interpersonal Communication Ethics: The Relationship Matters
Introduction
Student Application: Relational Responsibility
Interpersonal Communication
Distance
Interpersonal Responsibility
The Particular Matters
Hesed and the Shadows of Demand
The Limits of Interpersonal Skills
Pointing to a Dialogic Ethic in Interpersonal Communication
Communication Ethics: Reflection and Action
Engaging Communication Ethics through Literature: Les Misérables

Chapter 8 Organizational Communication Ethics: Community of Memory and Dwelling
Introduction
Student Application: Finding a Dwelling Place
Organizational Communication
Dwelling Place
Organizations and Institutions
Community of Memory within Organizations
Active Engagement—Organizational Participation
Accountability—Organizational Evaluation and the Good
Finding, Testing, and Protecting and Promoting the Good
Pointing to a Dialogic Ethic in Organizational Communication
Communication Ethics: Reflection and Action
Engaging Communication Ethics through Literature: Les Misérables

Chapter 9 Intercultural Communication Ethics: Before the Conversation Begins
Introduction
Student Application: The Unfamiliar
Intercultural Communication
Culture
A Shaping Guide
Individualism
Culture Shock
Difference as Rhetorical Interruption
The Local—Change and Resistance
The Inarticulate
Watching the Hands
The Guest
Pointing to a Dialogic Ethic in Intercultural Communication
Communication Ethics: Reflection and Action
Engaging Communication Ethics through Literature: Les Misérables

Chapter 10 Business and Professional Communication Ethics: Direction and Change
Introduction
Student Application: Finding Direction
Business and Professional Communication
The Dialectic of Direction and Change
A Unity of Contraries
Beyond Manners
Public Accountability: Plant and Pivot
Public Testing
Temporal Direction
Communicative Responsiveness
Pointing to a Dialogic Ethic in Business and Professional Communication
Communication Ethics: Reflection and Action
Engaging Communication Ethics through Literature: Les Misérables

Chapter 11 Integrated Marketing Communication Ethics: Coordinating Difference
Introduction
Student Application: Consistency of Message
Integrated Marketing Communication
Public Clarity and Caution
Ideas Matter
Collaborative Attentiveness: A Scarce Commodity
Integration
Pointing to a Dialogic Ethic in Integrated Marketing Communication
Communication Ethics: Reflection and Action
Engaging Communication Ethics through Literature: Les Misérables

Chapter 12 Health Care Communication Ethics: Responsive Labor
Introduction
Student Application: Responding to the Other
Health Care Communication
Health
Responsiveness
Care
A Labor of Care
From Technique to Tenacity
Pointing to a Dialogic Ethic in Health Care Communication Ethics
Communication Ethics: Reflection and Action
Engaging Communication Ethics through Literature: Les Misérables

Chapter 13 Media Ethics: Communicative Responsibility in a Digital World
Introduction
Student Application: Digital Engagement
Mediated Communication
The Public Sphere
A Tradition of Practice
A New Historical Moment
The Private Realm
Digital Responsibility
Consequences of Media Attributes
Incivility and Cyberbullying
Pointing to a Dialogic Ethic in Mediated Communication
Communication Ethics: Reflection and Action
Engaging Communication Ethics through Literature: Les Misérables

Chapter 14 Communication Ethics Literacy and Difference: Dialogic Learning
Introduction
Student Application: Understanding the Other
Pragmatic
Crisis Communication
A Historical Moment of Contending Goods
In Need of Glasses
Communication Ethics and the Public Domain
Communication Ethics Literacy
The Pragmatics of Dialogic Ethics
Communication Ethics: Reflection and Action
Engaging Communication Ethics through Literature: Les Misérables

Glossary of Terms

References

Index

Ronald C. Arnett

Ronald C. Arnett (Ph.D., Ohio University, 1978) is professor and chair of the Department of Communication & Rhetorical Studies and the Patricia Doherty Yoder and Ronald Wolfe Endowed Chair in Communication Ethics at Duquesne University. He is the former Henry Koren, C.S.Sp., Endowed Chair for Scholarly Excellence (2010–2015). He is the author/coauthor of eleven books and the recipient of six book awards. His most recent works include Levinas’s Rhetorical Demand: The Unending Obligation of Communication Ethics (2017, Southern Illinois University Press) and two award-winning works: Communication Ethics in Dark Times: Hannah Arendt’s Rhetoric of Warning and Hope and An Overture to Philosophy of Communication: The Carrier of Meaning (with Annette Holba). He was selected as a 2017 Distinguished Scholar by the National Communication Association.

Leeanne McManus

Leeanne M. Bell McManus (Ph.D., Duquesne University, 2007) is a professor in the Business Communication Department at Stevenson University and the Vice President of the Eastern Communication Association. She has co-authored two books, Communication Ethics Literacy: Dialogue and Difference (with Ronald C. Arnett and Janie Harden Fritz) and Event Planning: Communicating Theory and Practice (with Chip Rouse and Stephanie Verni). She has published excerpts in Integrated Marketing Communication: Creating Spaces for Engagement (with Chip Rouse), Exploring Communication Ethics: Interviews with Influential Scholars in the Field (with Ronald C. Arnett and Pat Arneson), and The Encyclopedia of Social Identity. Dr. Bell McManus has also published in Atlantic Journal of Communication, Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries, Communication Annual: Journal of the Pennsylvania Communication Association, Communication Education, Journal of the Association for Communication Administration, and Review of Communication.

Janie Fritz

Janie Harden Fritz (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1993) is professor and director of the B. A., M.A., and Ph.D. programs in the Department of Communication & Rhetorical Studies. Her research focuses on communicative practices that constitute, sever, and restore the ties that bind persons to the institutions of which they are a part. She is the author of Professional Civility: Communicative Virtue at Work (Peter Lang, 2013, which received the 2013 Clifford G. Christians Ethics Research Award from the Carl Couch Center for Social and Internet Research and the 2014 Everett Lee Hunt Award from the Eastern Communication Association), coeditor (with S. Alyssa Groom) of Communication Ethics and Crisis: Negotiating Differences in Public and Private Spheres (2012, Fairleigh Dickinson University Press), and coeditor (with Becky L. Omdahl) of Problematic Relationships in the Workplace (Peter Lang Press, 2006) and Problematic Relationships in the Workplace, Volume 2 (Peter Lang, 2012). Her most recent work focuses on the intersection of professional civility and leadership practices. Her work has been published in a number of scholarly journals. She is a past president of the Pennsylvania Communication Association, the Eastern Communication Association, and the Religious Communication Association, and she currently serves as the executive director of the Religious Communication Association. She has received numerous several awards for teaching, scholarship, and service, including
the Eugene P. Beard Award for Leadership in Ethics from Duquesne University.

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