Drugs, Brain, and Behavior

Author(s): John Salamone

Edition: 7

Copyright: 2019

Pages: 387

Choose Your Format

Ebook

$91.16

ISBN 9781524980306

Details Electronic Delivery EBOOK 180 days

It has been more than more than half a century since the “Psychopharmacology Revolution” swept through modern society, radically changing mental health practice, and altering the way people view psychiatric disorders. Large numbers of people in the US and other countries are now being treated with psychoactive drugs, including anti-anxiety agents, antidepressants, antipsychotics, stimulants for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and a host of other medications.  Furthermore, recreational drug taking remains very common, and drug dependence and substance use disorders are behavioral dysfunctions that have substantial health consequences, both physical and mental. Of course, despite the explosive development of new drugs, both licit and illicit, there is nothing new about the phenomenon of people taking drugs for their psychopharmacological properties.  Through the centuries, people have been taking drugs, mostly plant products, either to relax themselves, to blunt the sense of pain, to stimulate perceived energy, instigate action and enhance performance, or to fundamentally alter sensation or consciousness.  In a sense, the explosive growth of drug development over the last few decades has simply added to a tendency that was already present in several millennia of human history.  Drug taking in all its social, recreational and therapeutic contexts is a very important human phenomenon, and one which warrants serious scientific investigation.  The modern field of psychopharmacology focuses on the behavioral effects of drugs across these different contexts, and includes information from several disciplines, including psychology and psychiatry, and also physiology, neurochemistry, and neuroanatomy, all of which are ultimately necessary for explaining the ability of drugs to alter psychological processes. 

This book is intended to introduce students to the field of psychopharmacology, and provide a scientific basis for understanding the fundamental principles of drug effects on behavior by integrating information from these diverse disciplines. Thus, updated chapters provide the following:

  • an in-depth look as the basic science of chemical transmission in the nervous system, and how drugs affect synaptic function
  • a focus on the anatomy of neurotransmitter systems that are the substrates of action for psychoactive substances
  • a series of chapters specifically focusing on drug treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, depression and bipolar disorder, anxiety, Parkinson’s disease, cognitive dysfunctions such as Alzheimer’s disease and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • chapters focusing general phenomena related to substance abuse as well as chapters focusing on specific drugs or drug classes such as stimulants, alcohol, opiates, and hallucinogens

Preface

CHAPTER 1 Psychopharmacology: Historical Perspectives|
CHAPTER 2 Drug Classification and Behavioral Assessment
CHAPTER 3 Basic Principles of Pharmacology
CHAPTER 4 Excitability and Chemical Signaling in Nerve Cells
CHAPTER 5 Synaptic Transmission, Drugs, and Chemical Neuroanatomy
CHAPTER 6 Tolerance, Sensitization, Dependence, Abuse, and Addiction
CHAPTER 7 Psychomotor Stimulants and Antiparkinsonian Drugs
CHAPTER 8 Antipsychotic Drugs and Neurochemical Hypotheses of Schizophrenia
CHAPTER 9 Antidepressants and Mood Stabilizers for Bipolar Disorder
CHAPTER 10 Sedative–Hypnotics, Anxiolytics, and Anticonvulsants
CHAPTER 11 Drug Treatment of Cognitive Dysfunction
CHAPTER 12 Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Opiates and Their Antagonists
CHAPTER 13 Cannabinioids, Dissociative Anesthetics, Empathogens, and Hallucinogens

Bibliography

John Salamone

Dr. John Salamone received his bachelor's degree from Rockhurst University in Kansas City, Missouri in 1978, and his Ph.D. from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia in 1982.  For postdoctoral training, Dr. Salamone received a National Science Foundation grant and studied at Cambridge University in England, working with Susan Iversen and Trevor Robbins. Dr. Salamone stayed in England for several more years, working at Merck, Sharpe and Dohme pharmaceutical laboratories. Upon returning to the US, Dr. Salamone joined the Behavioral Neuroscience department at the University of Pittsburgh in 1986, and joined the University of Connecticut in 1988. Dr. Salamone has published more than 260 articles and book chapters focused on research in the fields of behavioral neuroscience and neuropsychopharmacology, focusing on the neural circuitry regulating motivation, with a particular emphasis on studies related to animal models of effort-related decision making, fatigue, depression and Parkinsonism. He was inducted as a member of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2002, and he has received the University of Connecticut Alumni Association Award for Excellence in Teaching.  He also received the Joseph V. Brady Research Award in 2015, is the co-editor-in-chief of Frontiers in Behavioural Neuroscience: Motivation and Reward. Dr. Salamone is a Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor, chair of the Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience, and the head of the Behavioral Neuroscience Division of the Psychological Sciences Department at the University of Connecticut.

It has been more than more than half a century since the “Psychopharmacology Revolution” swept through modern society, radically changing mental health practice, and altering the way people view psychiatric disorders. Large numbers of people in the US and other countries are now being treated with psychoactive drugs, including anti-anxiety agents, antidepressants, antipsychotics, stimulants for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and a host of other medications.  Furthermore, recreational drug taking remains very common, and drug dependence and substance use disorders are behavioral dysfunctions that have substantial health consequences, both physical and mental. Of course, despite the explosive development of new drugs, both licit and illicit, there is nothing new about the phenomenon of people taking drugs for their psychopharmacological properties.  Through the centuries, people have been taking drugs, mostly plant products, either to relax themselves, to blunt the sense of pain, to stimulate perceived energy, instigate action and enhance performance, or to fundamentally alter sensation or consciousness.  In a sense, the explosive growth of drug development over the last few decades has simply added to a tendency that was already present in several millennia of human history.  Drug taking in all its social, recreational and therapeutic contexts is a very important human phenomenon, and one which warrants serious scientific investigation.  The modern field of psychopharmacology focuses on the behavioral effects of drugs across these different contexts, and includes information from several disciplines, including psychology and psychiatry, and also physiology, neurochemistry, and neuroanatomy, all of which are ultimately necessary for explaining the ability of drugs to alter psychological processes. 

This book is intended to introduce students to the field of psychopharmacology, and provide a scientific basis for understanding the fundamental principles of drug effects on behavior by integrating information from these diverse disciplines. Thus, updated chapters provide the following:

  • an in-depth look as the basic science of chemical transmission in the nervous system, and how drugs affect synaptic function
  • a focus on the anatomy of neurotransmitter systems that are the substrates of action for psychoactive substances
  • a series of chapters specifically focusing on drug treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, depression and bipolar disorder, anxiety, Parkinson’s disease, cognitive dysfunctions such as Alzheimer’s disease and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • chapters focusing general phenomena related to substance abuse as well as chapters focusing on specific drugs or drug classes such as stimulants, alcohol, opiates, and hallucinogens

Preface

CHAPTER 1 Psychopharmacology: Historical Perspectives|
CHAPTER 2 Drug Classification and Behavioral Assessment
CHAPTER 3 Basic Principles of Pharmacology
CHAPTER 4 Excitability and Chemical Signaling in Nerve Cells
CHAPTER 5 Synaptic Transmission, Drugs, and Chemical Neuroanatomy
CHAPTER 6 Tolerance, Sensitization, Dependence, Abuse, and Addiction
CHAPTER 7 Psychomotor Stimulants and Antiparkinsonian Drugs
CHAPTER 8 Antipsychotic Drugs and Neurochemical Hypotheses of Schizophrenia
CHAPTER 9 Antidepressants and Mood Stabilizers for Bipolar Disorder
CHAPTER 10 Sedative–Hypnotics, Anxiolytics, and Anticonvulsants
CHAPTER 11 Drug Treatment of Cognitive Dysfunction
CHAPTER 12 Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Opiates and Their Antagonists
CHAPTER 13 Cannabinioids, Dissociative Anesthetics, Empathogens, and Hallucinogens

Bibliography

John Salamone

Dr. John Salamone received his bachelor's degree from Rockhurst University in Kansas City, Missouri in 1978, and his Ph.D. from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia in 1982.  For postdoctoral training, Dr. Salamone received a National Science Foundation grant and studied at Cambridge University in England, working with Susan Iversen and Trevor Robbins. Dr. Salamone stayed in England for several more years, working at Merck, Sharpe and Dohme pharmaceutical laboratories. Upon returning to the US, Dr. Salamone joined the Behavioral Neuroscience department at the University of Pittsburgh in 1986, and joined the University of Connecticut in 1988. Dr. Salamone has published more than 260 articles and book chapters focused on research in the fields of behavioral neuroscience and neuropsychopharmacology, focusing on the neural circuitry regulating motivation, with a particular emphasis on studies related to animal models of effort-related decision making, fatigue, depression and Parkinsonism. He was inducted as a member of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2002, and he has received the University of Connecticut Alumni Association Award for Excellence in Teaching.  He also received the Joseph V. Brady Research Award in 2015, is the co-editor-in-chief of Frontiers in Behavioural Neuroscience: Motivation and Reward. Dr. Salamone is a Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor, chair of the Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience, and the head of the Behavioral Neuroscience Division of the Psychological Sciences Department at the University of Connecticut.