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Fundamentals of Sports Ethics

Author(s): Gregg Twietmeyer

Edition: 1

Copyright: 2017

Pages: 266

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Many students come into sports ethics course with no previous exposure to academic philosophy at all. Students no longer have basic philosophic literacy.

Fundamentals of Sport Ethics sets a serious philosophic foundation upon which readers can engage sport ethics. The book introduces basic philosophic concepts that far too often sport philosophers take for granted and which students struggle.

Just released, Gregg Twietmeyer’s Fundamentals of Sport Ethics:

  • Is written in a hybrid format that includes original narrative/prose on each topic
  • Contains selections from philosophy, literature and journalism
  • Can be utilized with a myriad of sources and readings, including primary texts.

Chapter 1 What is Ethics? Why Bother Studying Sport Ethics? 
Foundational Concepts 
Normative & descriptive ethical claims 
Intrinsic and extrinsic goods 
What is Ethics? 
Ethics and other branches of philosophy 
Why bother with sports ethics? 
Sport and human culture 
Just Win? 
Sport is about the process not merely the product 
There are many shared excellences in sport 
Philosophic Selections 
Suggested Readings 
Bibliography 

Chapter 2 Good and Evil in Sport 
We Don’t Live Compartmentalized Lives 
There is More To Life than Practicalities 
Moral Questions Abound in Sport 
Accounts of Good and Evil 
Transcendence 
Hedonism 
Good & evil as an illusion 
Both Good and Evil Occur in Sport 
Philosophic Selections 
Suggested Readings 
Bibliography 

Chapter 3 Realism and Relativism in Sport 
The Strengths of Relativism 
Modesty, tolerance, and empiricism, oh my! 
The Weaknesses of Relativism 
Moral Realism is the Only Tenable Position 
Why Does the Status of Moral Truth Matter to Athletes, Coaches, Administrators or Fans? 
Philosophic Selections 
Suggested Readings 
Bibliography 

Chapter 4 Utilitarianism 
Bentham’s Quantitative Hedonism 
J.S. Mill’s Qualitative Hedonism 
Act versus Rule Utilitarianism 
The Strengths of Utilitarianism 
The Weaknesses of Utilitarianism 
Utilitarian Responses 
Utilitarianism & Sport 
Philosophic Selections 
Suggested Readings 
Bibliography 

Chapter 5 Deontological Ethics 
Kant and the Categorical Imperative 
Ross, Prima Facie Duties and Intuitionism 
The Strengths of Deontological Ethics 
The Weaknesses of Deontological Ethics 
Deontologist Responses 
Deontology and Sport? 
The nature of sport? 
Rule enforcement? 
Philosophic Selections 
Suggested Readings 
Bibliography 

Chapter 6 Virtue Ethics 
Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics 
The Cardinal Virtues 
The Strengths of Virtue Ethics 
The Weaknesses of Virtue Ethics 
Virtue Ethicist Responses 
Virtue Ethics and Sport? 
Philosophic Selections 
Suggested Readings 
Bibliography 

Chapter 7 Why be Good? 
The Ring of Gyges 
Socrates’ response 
Tit- for-Tat 
Plato & Singer: Is Justice Something We Serve or Merely Something We Use? 
“Why Be Good?” and Sport 
The practical implications of intrinsic and extrinsic accounts of justice 
Transcendence and sport? 
Philosophic Selections 
Suggested Readings 
Bibliography 

Chapter 8 How Do We Promote Ethical Behavior? 
Mediating Institutions 
Solidarity & subsidiarity 
The Strengths of Mediating Institutions 
The Weaknesses of Mediating Institutions 
Responses in Defense of Mediating Institutions 
Solidarity, Subsidiarity, Mediating Institutions, Sport? 
Sport, Philosophy and the Good Life 
Philosophic Selections 
Suggested Readings 
Bibliography 

Appendix 

Index

Gregg Twietmeyer

Dr. Twietmeyer has taught sport philosophy and sport ethics for over 10 years. He received his bachelor’s degree in Art from Concordia University, Ann Arbor in 1997 where he also played soccer and worked in the athletics department. Between 1997 and 2003 Dr. Twietmeyer worked in graphic arts, marketing and coaching. In August 2003 he received his Master’s Degree in Sport Management from the University of Michigan. Dr. Twietmeyer then spent a year working at Albion College, in Albion, MI as the Assistant Sports Information Director, where he was involved in media production, web design and game management.

After working for a year at Albion, Dr. Twietmeyer decided to pursue a Ph.D. in sport philosophy at the Pennsylvania State University. He first taught sport ethics while at Penn State University as a graduate student. Since graduating from Penn State in 2008, he has continued to teach sport ethics, first at Marshall University (2008–2015) and now at Mississippi State University (2015–present).

Dr. Twietmeyer has published widely and presented his research around the world. He has coached high school and YMCA soccer and currently volunteers as a U6, U8, and U12 recreational soccer coach for the Starkville Soccer Association. Dr. Twietmeyer also continues to play soccer whenever possible. For the past 6 years he has run a summer camp, through a partnership with the nonprofit charity ICanShine, which helps special needs children and adults learn how to ride a two wheel bike independently (www.bulldogbike.msstate.edu). In each of the 6 years the camp has been offered, the students in Dr. Twietmeyer’s summer section of sport ethics have volunteered at the camp as part of the course. Dr. Twietmeyer resides in Starkville, MS with his wife Sarah and their five children.

Twietmeyer has produced an excellent introduction to the subject that will be a hugely valuable resource for undergraduate sports students. Twietmeyer’s commitment as a sport philosopher to ‘articulation rather than consensus’ (p. 236) informs his treatment of the subject: this is a textbook with ‘a stiff moral spine’.
Mike Tyler, University of Worcester,  UK
Read the Full Review in Journal of the Philosophy of Sport

Twietmeyer writes in a clear, concise, and uncompromising way. Applications of ethics to sport are on target and need to be heeded in this day and age. The book is an important addition to our literature in sport philosophy.
Scott Kretchmar, Penn State University

Dr. Twietmeyer's book is filled with thorough and varying philosophical perspectives. The text is quite riveting, and truly made me think about the challenges of being a sports practitioner. The transparency and honesty are valuable components, because one is prompted to think about all the potential points of concern necessary to efficiently operate in such a wide-ranging field.
Leo, Mississippi State University Student

Related ISBN's: 9781465287496, 9781524916114

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