Insightful Branding: People-Centric Tactics for Building Brands

Author(s): RYAN EANES

Edition: 1

Copyright: 2023

Pages: 202

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$70.00

ISBN 9798765783962

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Brands and branding are inescapable parts of life in the 21st century. Even young children can easily identify countless logos; as adults, we develop brand preferences that include feelings of trust and loyalty, even when branding is the only significant difference between product or service offerings. The typical consumer lives, works, and plays in a crowded “brandscape” that we’ve grown comfortable with. The average person can tell you that yes, brands exist, but that same person will probably be unable to articulate why, exactly, they are so important—that brands are, in fact, the “connective tissue” that facilitates consumer relationships with organizations and their offerings.

Primarily aimed at undergraduates interested in pursuing a career in marketing, advertising, PR, or a related industry, this book is also suitable for entrepreneurs looking for an accessible guide to building a brand, or for practically anyone interested in learning more about branding. No significant background knowledge of business procedure or marketing is necessary.

Written in a personable, engaging, and friendly style, the book begins by illustrating the evolution of brands over the centuries, then turns to an examination of the many responsibilities and expectations put upon a successful brand. The text also walks students through the basic process of building a brand from scratch, highlighting potential opportunities and pitfalls along the way. Topics covered include the STP (segmentation, targeting, and positioning) model, developing vibrant buyer personas, using psychological principles to develop resonant brand livery, building sturdy brand personalities, and using the tools of the trade to connect the potential customer to an appropriate brand.

Preface
Disclaimer
Introduction

CHAPTER 1 The Origins of Branding 
Craftsmen and Cattlemen: Branding Before Brands 
Pre-Industrial Manufacturing 
Box 1 .1 Store Brands and Product Brands 
The Industrial Revolution 
Box 1 .2 Transportation Infrastructure, Today and Yesterday  
Brands as Intellectual Property  
Box 1 .3 Trademarks, Service Marks, and Registered Trademarks  
The Emergence of Modern Branding 
The 1900s: Brands and Features of Offerings 
The 1930s: Brands and Benefits of Offerings 
The 1960s: Brands and the Offering Experience 
The 2000s and Beyond: Brands, Identity, and Inclusion 
Conclusion  
Key Terms 
Review Questions

CHAPTER 2 Brand Anatomy
On the Surface: Perceptual Attributes, Voice, and Personality
Perceptual Attributes
Logos and Typography
Color
Box 2.1 Refinement vs. Disruption
Packaging
Environments and Sensory Elements
Ancillary Elements
Brand Voice
Brand Personality
An Invisible Skeleton: Underlying Attributes and the Brand Platform
Box 2.2 Don’t Reinvent the Wheel
Mission
Vision  
Values
Conclusion
Key Terms
Review Questions

CHAPTER 3 People Bring Brands to Life
Organizations and Stakeholders
Box 3.1 Nonprofit Branding 
Box 3.2 Stakeholders vs. Shareholders
Consumers
Box 3.3 The Paradox of Choice
The Black Box
So… What Is a Brand?
Conclusion
Key Terms
Review Questions

CHAPTER 4 The Complex Consumer
Self-Concept
Domains and Appraisals
The Actual Self
The Ideal Self
Box 4.1 The “Ideal” Body
The Ought Self
Consumer Identity
The “Performance” of Identity
Box 4.2 Restaurant Roles
Display of Identity
The Creation of Personal Identity
Consumer Identity and Groups
Reference Groups
Priority
Affect 
Formality
Individual Identity vs. Group Identity
Conclusion
Key Terms
Review Questions

CHAPTER 5 Segmentation and Targeting
Segmentation 
Box 5.1 Post hoc vs. A priori 
Segmentation Variables  
Demographic Variables 
Geographic Variables 
Behavioral Variables 
Psychographic Variables
Defining Segments  
Box 5.2 Every Consumer Is Not Your Customer  
Confirming Segment Viability 
Rules for Viability of Segments 
Using Empirical Data to Evaluate Viability 
Creating Personas
Targeting
Single-Segment Strategy
Box 5.3 Brand Extensions and Line Extensions
Multisegment Strategy
Conclusion
Key Terms
Review Questions

CHAPTER 6 Positioning and Brand Personality
Positioning
Understanding What Your Consumer Values
Box 6.1 What You Value Changes in Context
Evaluating Competitors 
Box 6.2 Lifestyles, Psychographics, and Positioning 
Surveying Consumer Attitudes 
Box 6.3 So You Want to Build a Survey. Now What? 
Intuiting Consumer Attitudes
Building the Perceptual Map 
Building a Positioning Statement 
Brand Personality
Dimensions of Brand Personality
Creating a Descriptive “Personality Pastiche”
Can We Be Friends? 
Conclusion 
Key Terms
Review Questions

CHAPTER 7 Brand Design and Consistency
Brand Design
Naming
Types of Names
Additional Resources
Vocabulary
Additional Resources
Voice
Additional Resources
Symbolism
Additional Resources
Imagery
Additional Resources
Interaction
Additional Resources
Your Branding Guide
Conclusion
Key Terms 
Review Questions

Acknowledgments
Glossary
References
About the Author

RYAN EANES

Dr. Ryan Eanes is an award-winning educator and faculty member of the Klein College of Media and Communication at Temple University in Philadelphia. His courses on brand strategy and advertising psychology are perennially popular among students of advertising, PR, and related disciplines. After spending nearly a decade working at the intersection of television, the Internet, and social media in the commercial sector, Dr. Eanes went on to earn his Ph.D. at the University of Oregon in 2015. He is one of a distinguished few to have earned the Master-level Insights Professional Certification (IPC) from the Insights Association, underscoring his commitment to marketing research and education. Dr. Eanes lives in Philadelphia with his trusty Shiba Inu named Hiro.

Brands and branding are inescapable parts of life in the 21st century. Even young children can easily identify countless logos; as adults, we develop brand preferences that include feelings of trust and loyalty, even when branding is the only significant difference between product or service offerings. The typical consumer lives, works, and plays in a crowded “brandscape” that we’ve grown comfortable with. The average person can tell you that yes, brands exist, but that same person will probably be unable to articulate why, exactly, they are so important—that brands are, in fact, the “connective tissue” that facilitates consumer relationships with organizations and their offerings.

Primarily aimed at undergraduates interested in pursuing a career in marketing, advertising, PR, or a related industry, this book is also suitable for entrepreneurs looking for an accessible guide to building a brand, or for practically anyone interested in learning more about branding. No significant background knowledge of business procedure or marketing is necessary.

Written in a personable, engaging, and friendly style, the book begins by illustrating the evolution of brands over the centuries, then turns to an examination of the many responsibilities and expectations put upon a successful brand. The text also walks students through the basic process of building a brand from scratch, highlighting potential opportunities and pitfalls along the way. Topics covered include the STP (segmentation, targeting, and positioning) model, developing vibrant buyer personas, using psychological principles to develop resonant brand livery, building sturdy brand personalities, and using the tools of the trade to connect the potential customer to an appropriate brand.

Preface
Disclaimer
Introduction

CHAPTER 1 The Origins of Branding 
Craftsmen and Cattlemen: Branding Before Brands 
Pre-Industrial Manufacturing 
Box 1 .1 Store Brands and Product Brands 
The Industrial Revolution 
Box 1 .2 Transportation Infrastructure, Today and Yesterday  
Brands as Intellectual Property  
Box 1 .3 Trademarks, Service Marks, and Registered Trademarks  
The Emergence of Modern Branding 
The 1900s: Brands and Features of Offerings 
The 1930s: Brands and Benefits of Offerings 
The 1960s: Brands and the Offering Experience 
The 2000s and Beyond: Brands, Identity, and Inclusion 
Conclusion  
Key Terms 
Review Questions

CHAPTER 2 Brand Anatomy
On the Surface: Perceptual Attributes, Voice, and Personality
Perceptual Attributes
Logos and Typography
Color
Box 2.1 Refinement vs. Disruption
Packaging
Environments and Sensory Elements
Ancillary Elements
Brand Voice
Brand Personality
An Invisible Skeleton: Underlying Attributes and the Brand Platform
Box 2.2 Don’t Reinvent the Wheel
Mission
Vision  
Values
Conclusion
Key Terms
Review Questions

CHAPTER 3 People Bring Brands to Life
Organizations and Stakeholders
Box 3.1 Nonprofit Branding 
Box 3.2 Stakeholders vs. Shareholders
Consumers
Box 3.3 The Paradox of Choice
The Black Box
So… What Is a Brand?
Conclusion
Key Terms
Review Questions

CHAPTER 4 The Complex Consumer
Self-Concept
Domains and Appraisals
The Actual Self
The Ideal Self
Box 4.1 The “Ideal” Body
The Ought Self
Consumer Identity
The “Performance” of Identity
Box 4.2 Restaurant Roles
Display of Identity
The Creation of Personal Identity
Consumer Identity and Groups
Reference Groups
Priority
Affect 
Formality
Individual Identity vs. Group Identity
Conclusion
Key Terms
Review Questions

CHAPTER 5 Segmentation and Targeting
Segmentation 
Box 5.1 Post hoc vs. A priori 
Segmentation Variables  
Demographic Variables 
Geographic Variables 
Behavioral Variables 
Psychographic Variables
Defining Segments  
Box 5.2 Every Consumer Is Not Your Customer  
Confirming Segment Viability 
Rules for Viability of Segments 
Using Empirical Data to Evaluate Viability 
Creating Personas
Targeting
Single-Segment Strategy
Box 5.3 Brand Extensions and Line Extensions
Multisegment Strategy
Conclusion
Key Terms
Review Questions

CHAPTER 6 Positioning and Brand Personality
Positioning
Understanding What Your Consumer Values
Box 6.1 What You Value Changes in Context
Evaluating Competitors 
Box 6.2 Lifestyles, Psychographics, and Positioning 
Surveying Consumer Attitudes 
Box 6.3 So You Want to Build a Survey. Now What? 
Intuiting Consumer Attitudes
Building the Perceptual Map 
Building a Positioning Statement 
Brand Personality
Dimensions of Brand Personality
Creating a Descriptive “Personality Pastiche”
Can We Be Friends? 
Conclusion 
Key Terms
Review Questions

CHAPTER 7 Brand Design and Consistency
Brand Design
Naming
Types of Names
Additional Resources
Vocabulary
Additional Resources
Voice
Additional Resources
Symbolism
Additional Resources
Imagery
Additional Resources
Interaction
Additional Resources
Your Branding Guide
Conclusion
Key Terms 
Review Questions

Acknowledgments
Glossary
References
About the Author

RYAN EANES

Dr. Ryan Eanes is an award-winning educator and faculty member of the Klein College of Media and Communication at Temple University in Philadelphia. His courses on brand strategy and advertising psychology are perennially popular among students of advertising, PR, and related disciplines. After spending nearly a decade working at the intersection of television, the Internet, and social media in the commercial sector, Dr. Eanes went on to earn his Ph.D. at the University of Oregon in 2015. He is one of a distinguished few to have earned the Master-level Insights Professional Certification (IPC) from the Insights Association, underscoring his commitment to marketing research and education. Dr. Eanes lives in Philadelphia with his trusty Shiba Inu named Hiro.