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Latino Politics in the United States: Race, Ethnicity, Class and Gender in the Mexican American and Puerto Rican Experience

Author(s): Victor Rodriguez

Edition: 1

Copyright: 2005

Pages: 248

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Filling a large void in the market, Latino Politics in the United States: Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in the Mexican American and Puerto Rican Experience combines theory with empirics; history, political science and sociology; case studies and firm generalizations.

Recently revised to make the material more accessible, Latino Politics in the United States compares and contrasts the racialized experiences of Mexican-Americans and Puerto Ricans in the United States, making the kind of comparisons among Latino experiences that are so rare in academic books.

Latino Politics in the United States: Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in the Mexican American and Puerto Rican Experience:

  • Addresses the ways in which Latin American migrants’ cultural and national differences are virtually erased upon settling in the United States.
  • Is chock full of interesting historical events and empirical details built upon the theory presented. 
  • Presents a complex web: the social, economic and racial matrix that has turned urban cores into economic “badlands,” providing the explosive mixture that ignited in the 1992 Los Angeles Riot events. 
  • Examines how Latinos, organizing from the bottom up, brought about an end to what was in effect a quasi-apartheid system. 
  • Ends on a high and hopeful note, at the other end of the Chicano-Boricua geographical span in Vieques. 

 

Latino Politics in the United States is about understanding oppression, but it is also, and for the most part, about resistance and victory. I think that’s why I enjoyed reading it as I think you will too.
Raul A. Fernandez, School of Social Science, University of California, Irvine

Chapter 1 The Racialization of Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans: 1890s–1930s
Abstract
Introduction
Scope and Concepts
Historical Scope
Social Theory, Racialization and Popular Culture
The Racialization of Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans
Historical Processes of Racialization
Imposition and Subordination
Puerto Ricans
Ideology and Institutional Arrangements
Placement in the Racial Hierarchy
Crystallization of a Racial Identity
Conclusions
References
Endnotes

Chapter 2 The 1992 “Angelazo,” Los Angeles, U.S.A.: “A House Divided Against Itself...”
Abstract
Introduction
Collective Behavior in the United States
Genesis of the Social Despair
Joining the Ranks of the Third World?
Growing Social Inequality
A Post-Industrial Society for a Global Economy
Race, Poverty, and Social Inequality
Inner Cities: Economic Deserts
Epilogue?: Forging a Political Consensus
Epilogue to an Epilogue: or “How Los Angeles’ Wounds Fester”
Unmet Expectations
A Cacophony of Ironies
A Vision for the Future?
References
Endnotes

Chapter 3 Boricuas, African Americans, and Chicanos in the “Far West”: Notes on the Puerto Rican Pro-Independence Movement in California, 1960s–1980s
Abstract
Introduction
Puerto Ricans in California
The Demography of Puerto Ricans in Southern California
“La Lucha” (The Struggle) for Puerto Rican Independence in California
“La Lucha” in the Bay Area
“‘La Lucha’ in Los Angeles”
Conclusions
References
Endnotes

Chapter 4 ¡Sí Se Puede! The Mobilization of Naturalized Latinas/os in Santa Ana, CA: 1990–2003
Abstract
Introduction
Historical Context and Racialization
Historical Processes of Racialization
Imposition/Subordination
Challenging Ideology and Institutional Arrangements: Education
Education in California Today
Ideology and Latino Education
Resisting Ideology in the Educational System
Mobilizing Latinos in Santa Ana
Organizing the Latino Community, 1980s
Mobilizing the Naturalized Latino Citizens
Santa Ana 1996–2002: Educational Policy to Empower Latinos
“The Empire Strikes Back”: The Recall
“Unholy” Alliances: Santa Ana
Conclusions: What Did the Recall Mean for Latino Empowerment?
References
Endnotes

Chapter 5 ¡Ni Una Bomba Más!: Racialization and Memory in the Vieques Social Movement
Abstract
Introduction
Racialization, Ideology and Imperialism
Constructing “Subjects”: Racialization of Puerto Rico and Vieques
Historical Processes of Racilaization
Limiting Access and Control of Land in Vieques
Resistance to “Expropriation”
Ideology and Institutional Arrangements
Placement in the Racial Hierarchy
Crystallization of a Racial Identity
Challenging Racialization
Construction of a Viequense Cultural Identity
Women in the Vieques Social Movement
The “Federal” Is Transgressed
Allies in the Media
Conclusions
References
Endnotes

Victor Rodriguez

Latino Politics in the United States is about understanding oppression, but it is also, and for the most part, about resistance and victory. I think that’s why I enjoyed reading it as I think you will too.
Raul A. Fernandez, School of Social Science, University of California, Irvine

Related ISBN's: 9781465209993, 9781465204554

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Details Electronic Delivery EBOOK 180 days