Medical Communication: Physical and Psychological Wellness

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New Third Edition Coming Soon!

Communication-related issues lead to thousands of deaths annually.

The third edition of Medical Communication: Physical and Psychological Wellness creates a more health-conscious society by presenting unique and groundbreaking perspectives on communication in the practice of everyday healthcare – increasing patient safety and literacy.

Medical Communication incorporates cutting-edge information needed to navigate today's dynamic culture of medicine and healthcare. This life skills text educates all individuals, both those within healthcare professions as well as society in general, as every human being will eventually interface with the healthcare system.

An interdisciplinary (i.e., Medicine and Communication Studies) text that brings together authors who delineate the many aspects of communication in the everyday delivery of medical care, Medical Communication: Defining the Discipline:

  • Covers interpersonal (i.e.., provider-provider; patient-provider) and other communication practices that generally go unrecognized including professionalism, ethics, end-of-life care, and safety in the fast paced world of medicine.
  • Overcomes the existing “turf” wars that currently exist in fields such as health communication and health psychology.
  • Is Student Friendly! The publication includes an Enhanced Online Learning Package seamlessly integrated within the book's pedagogy that includes interactive exercises, interviews, vignettes based on real-life scenarios, flash cards and more.
  • Is Easy to Adopt! Chapter outlines, supplemental teaching materials, PowerPoint™ presentations, and comprehensive test banks are provided to adopting instructors.

 

 

CHAPTER 1: THE IMPERATIVE OF MEDICAL COMMUNICATION
I. Introduction
II. History of Healthcare
III. How Safe is Healthcare?
IV. Axioms about Medical Communication
V. Rapid Advancements
VI. The Basics of Communication
VII. Conclusion

CHAPTER 2: THE NEUROSCIENCE AND PSYCHOLOGY OF COMMUNICATION
I. Introduction
II. The human brain
III. The evolution and anatomy of the brain
IV. Delving further into the brain
V. Limbic system
VI. Emotion and the human brain
VII. Stress response and the brain
VIII. Stress and coping
IX. Language and the human brain
X. Speech and the human brain
XI. Hearing and the human brain
XII. Brain imaging technologies
XIII. Conclusion
XIV. The basics of communSemantics
XV. Conclusion

CHAPTER 3: THE PHYSIOLOGY OF TEMPERAMENTS, COMMUNICATION TRAITS, AND PREDISPOSITIONS
I. Introduction
II. Human biology and communication
III. Traits and temperaments
IV. Communication tendencies: Apprehension traits versus presentation traits
V. Psychological traits and communication behavior
VI. Disorders in the inherited brain adversely affecting communication
VII. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
VIII. The human brain, intelligence, and communication
IX. Conclusion

CHAPTER 4: THE INFLUENCE OF COMPETENT COMMUNICATION WITHIN HEALTHCARE
I. Introduction
II. Definitional issues
III. Physiological differences
IV. Sex and personality differences
V. Gender and the patient-provider dyad
VI. Male and female healthcare providers
VII. The engendered patient
VIII. Building toward tomorrow
IX. Communication competency and its outcomes
X. Conclusion

CHAPTER 5: NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION IN HEALTHCARE
I. Introduction
II. Brief history of nonverbal communication
III. Functions of nonverbal communication
IV. Components of nonverbal communication
V. Conclusion

CHAPTER 6: INTERCULTURAL SENSITIVITY AND BEHAVIORS
I. Introduction
II. Context and culture
III. Culture and interpersonal communication
IV. Cultural empathy
V. Interpreters and translators
VI. Patient and provider assumptions
VII. The economics of culture
VIII. Conclusion

CHAPTER 7: HEALTH LITERACY: THE NOT SO SILENT EPIDEMIC
I. Introduction
II. Literacy and its ubiquity
III. Basic terminology of literacy
IV. Defining health literacy
V. Demographics of health literacy
VI. Assessing health literacy
VII. Assessment tools
VIII. E-literacy
IX. Internet information credibility
X. Simplifying the link between health literacy and outcomes
XI. Conclusion

CHAPTER 8: HUMOR AND AGGRESSIVE COMMUNICATION IN HEALTHCARE
I. Introduction
II. The physiology of humor
III. Humor in the patient-provider relationship
IV. Aggressive communication
V. The origins of aggressive communication
VI. Verbal aggressiveness
VII. Verbal trigger events
VIII. Nursing and aggression
IX. Argumentativeness
X. Fighting against aggressive communication
XI. Conflict
XII. Physician-nurse power
XIII. Conclusion

CHAPTER 9: MEDICAL AND RELATIONAL INFORMATION PROCESSING
I. Introduction
II. The physiology of hearing
III. Information processing
IV. The hand-off process
V. Mindfulness
VI. Narratives in healthcare
VII. Information gathering: The ultimate story teller
VIII. Listening
IX. Therapeutic Writing
X. Conclusion

CHAPTER 10: THEORIES OF HEALTH COMMUNICATION
I. Introduction
II. Functions of communication in the health context
III. Communication contexts within health communication
IV. Communication traits and health behavior
V. Health beliefs model
VI. Theory of reasoned action (TRA)
VII. Extended parallel process model (EPPM)
VIII. Uncertainty management theory
IX. Diffusion of innovation (DIT)
X. Transtheoretical model
XI. Conclusion

CHAPTER 11: ASSESSMENT AND TRAINING WITHIN HEALTHCARE: TRAINING THE TRAINERS
I. Introduction
II. Reasons for Training
III. Medical communication skills training
IV. Considerations for effective training
V. Role of the trainer
VI. E-learning
VII. Skill sets of the trainer
VIII. Audience needs
IX. Training objectives
X. Types of training delivery and vehicles
XI. Instructional aids
XII. Assessing the efficacy of training
XIII. Feedback
XIV. Conclusion

CHAPTER 12: PROFESSIONALISM, ETHICS, INFORMAED CONSENT, APOLOGY, AND END-OF-LIFE CARE
I. Introduction

II. Defining professionalism
III. Professional ethos
IV. The professions of medical care
V. Ethical practices for medical professionals
VI. Patient needs
VII. Professionalism and end-of-life issues
VIII. Organ Donation
IX. Informed consent
X. Informed consent in action
XI. Problems in the informed consent process
XII. Legal implications of informed consent
XIII. Types of informed consent
XIV. Apology
XV. Philosophical perspective of apology
XVI. The behavior of apology
XVII. Legal perspectives of apology
XVIII. Conclusion

CHAPTER 13: COMMUNICATION AND MENTAL HEALTH: THE ROLE OF TALK IN PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL BEING VIA TELEMEDICINE AND TELEHEALTH
I. Introduction
II. How the pandemic changed mental healthcare delivery (telehealth/telemedicine)
III. E-therapy/telemedicine/telehealth
IV. What is telemedicine/telehealth?
V. The practice of mental health counseling and use of telemedicine/telehealth before COVID-19
VI. The practice of mental health counseling and use of telemedicine/telehealth during COVID-19
VII. E-training in mental health counseling
VIII. E-patient perspectives
IX. Developing rapport and therapeutic alliances with the E-patient
X. Patient and provider satisfaction with telemedicine/telehealth in mental health
XI. Federal changes to telemedicine/telehealth policy
XII. Fee for service healthcare system
XIII. Expanding telemedicine/telehealth access
XIV. Health insurance portability and accountability act (HIPPA)
XV. Ethical considerations
XVI. Is telemedicine/telehealth here to stay?
XVII. Conclusion

CHAPTER 14: MEDICAL COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY: CURRENTS AND FUTURES
I. Introduction
II. Electronic records
III. Complications of EMR/HER
IV. Legal implication
V. Other technological factors in healthcare communication
VI. E-patients
VII. E-training
VIII. E-therapy
IX. Mobile technology
X. SMART technology
XI. Social media
XII. Credibility and misinformation about health online
XIII. Biometrics
XIV. Telehealth
XV. Robotics in healthcare delivery
XVI. The future of healthcare communication: Concluding thoughts
XVII. Conclusion

Theodore A Avtgis

Theodore A. Avtgis (Ph.D., Kent State University, 1999) is President of Medical Communication Specialists (MCS), a consulting firm that focuses on communication training and development efforts for medical personnel and first responders. He has published dozens of peer-reviewed research articles, thirteen books, twenty-two book chapters, and dozens of professional presentations. His research focuses on health communication, risk and crisis communication, and aggressive communication.

Kevin Wright

Kevin B. Wright (PhD, University of Oklahoma, 1999) is a professor in the Department of Communication at George Mason University. His main research interests include social media and health campaigns, online health information–seeking behaviors, online social support and health outcomes, and stress and burnout among healthcare workers.

Veronica Nuzzolo

Medical Communication: Defining the Discipline is an extraordinary book! I have only had time to tear the cellophane off and thumb through it, but I can tell you with certainty that it is going to be one of the most helpful books in my collection.
Valerie Evans Minor MSN, RN, Alderson-Broaddus College 

Medical Communication: Defining the Discipline deserves a place on the bookshelf of everyone in health care – nurses, physicians, administrators, and those shaping its future. As a reference, it should become well worn and treasured!
David Kappel, MD, FACS, West Virginia State Trauma System

Medical Communication: Defining the Discipline represents a much needed and landmark work on medical communication. The text fully integrates the most important communication concepts into a context where effective communication is of the utmost importance.
Andrew S. Rancer, Ph.D., University of Akron

Medical Communication: Defining the Discipline is an excellent primer on medical communication that provides information that is both practical and thought provoking. It is an excellent foundational text for anyone who is pursuing or considering a career in healthcare.
Valerie B. Satkoske, MSW, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh

Medical Communication: Defining the Discipline is aimed at giving health care professionals a better understanding of the discipline of communication, its scientific basis and its practice. It is illustrated with examples of good and not so good communication behavior.
Thomas R. Gadacz, MD, FACS, Medical College of Georgia

New Third Edition Coming Soon!

Communication-related issues lead to thousands of deaths annually.

The third edition of Medical Communication: Physical and Psychological Wellness creates a more health-conscious society by presenting unique and groundbreaking perspectives on communication in the practice of everyday healthcare – increasing patient safety and literacy.

Medical Communication incorporates cutting-edge information needed to navigate today's dynamic culture of medicine and healthcare. This life skills text educates all individuals, both those within healthcare professions as well as society in general, as every human being will eventually interface with the healthcare system.

An interdisciplinary (i.e., Medicine and Communication Studies) text that brings together authors who delineate the many aspects of communication in the everyday delivery of medical care, Medical Communication: Defining the Discipline:

  • Covers interpersonal (i.e.., provider-provider; patient-provider) and other communication practices that generally go unrecognized including professionalism, ethics, end-of-life care, and safety in the fast paced world of medicine.
  • Overcomes the existing “turf” wars that currently exist in fields such as health communication and health psychology.
  • Is Student Friendly! The publication includes an Enhanced Online Learning Package seamlessly integrated within the book's pedagogy that includes interactive exercises, interviews, vignettes based on real-life scenarios, flash cards and more.
  • Is Easy to Adopt! Chapter outlines, supplemental teaching materials, PowerPoint™ presentations, and comprehensive test banks are provided to adopting instructors.

 

 

CHAPTER 1: THE IMPERATIVE OF MEDICAL COMMUNICATION
I. Introduction
II. History of Healthcare
III. How Safe is Healthcare?
IV. Axioms about Medical Communication
V. Rapid Advancements
VI. The Basics of Communication
VII. Conclusion

CHAPTER 2: THE NEUROSCIENCE AND PSYCHOLOGY OF COMMUNICATION
I. Introduction
II. The human brain
III. The evolution and anatomy of the brain
IV. Delving further into the brain
V. Limbic system
VI. Emotion and the human brain
VII. Stress response and the brain
VIII. Stress and coping
IX. Language and the human brain
X. Speech and the human brain
XI. Hearing and the human brain
XII. Brain imaging technologies
XIII. Conclusion
XIV. The basics of communSemantics
XV. Conclusion

CHAPTER 3: THE PHYSIOLOGY OF TEMPERAMENTS, COMMUNICATION TRAITS, AND PREDISPOSITIONS
I. Introduction
II. Human biology and communication
III. Traits and temperaments
IV. Communication tendencies: Apprehension traits versus presentation traits
V. Psychological traits and communication behavior
VI. Disorders in the inherited brain adversely affecting communication
VII. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
VIII. The human brain, intelligence, and communication
IX. Conclusion

CHAPTER 4: THE INFLUENCE OF COMPETENT COMMUNICATION WITHIN HEALTHCARE
I. Introduction
II. Definitional issues
III. Physiological differences
IV. Sex and personality differences
V. Gender and the patient-provider dyad
VI. Male and female healthcare providers
VII. The engendered patient
VIII. Building toward tomorrow
IX. Communication competency and its outcomes
X. Conclusion

CHAPTER 5: NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION IN HEALTHCARE
I. Introduction
II. Brief history of nonverbal communication
III. Functions of nonverbal communication
IV. Components of nonverbal communication
V. Conclusion

CHAPTER 6: INTERCULTURAL SENSITIVITY AND BEHAVIORS
I. Introduction
II. Context and culture
III. Culture and interpersonal communication
IV. Cultural empathy
V. Interpreters and translators
VI. Patient and provider assumptions
VII. The economics of culture
VIII. Conclusion

CHAPTER 7: HEALTH LITERACY: THE NOT SO SILENT EPIDEMIC
I. Introduction
II. Literacy and its ubiquity
III. Basic terminology of literacy
IV. Defining health literacy
V. Demographics of health literacy
VI. Assessing health literacy
VII. Assessment tools
VIII. E-literacy
IX. Internet information credibility
X. Simplifying the link between health literacy and outcomes
XI. Conclusion

CHAPTER 8: HUMOR AND AGGRESSIVE COMMUNICATION IN HEALTHCARE
I. Introduction
II. The physiology of humor
III. Humor in the patient-provider relationship
IV. Aggressive communication
V. The origins of aggressive communication
VI. Verbal aggressiveness
VII. Verbal trigger events
VIII. Nursing and aggression
IX. Argumentativeness
X. Fighting against aggressive communication
XI. Conflict
XII. Physician-nurse power
XIII. Conclusion

CHAPTER 9: MEDICAL AND RELATIONAL INFORMATION PROCESSING
I. Introduction
II. The physiology of hearing
III. Information processing
IV. The hand-off process
V. Mindfulness
VI. Narratives in healthcare
VII. Information gathering: The ultimate story teller
VIII. Listening
IX. Therapeutic Writing
X. Conclusion

CHAPTER 10: THEORIES OF HEALTH COMMUNICATION
I. Introduction
II. Functions of communication in the health context
III. Communication contexts within health communication
IV. Communication traits and health behavior
V. Health beliefs model
VI. Theory of reasoned action (TRA)
VII. Extended parallel process model (EPPM)
VIII. Uncertainty management theory
IX. Diffusion of innovation (DIT)
X. Transtheoretical model
XI. Conclusion

CHAPTER 11: ASSESSMENT AND TRAINING WITHIN HEALTHCARE: TRAINING THE TRAINERS
I. Introduction
II. Reasons for Training
III. Medical communication skills training
IV. Considerations for effective training
V. Role of the trainer
VI. E-learning
VII. Skill sets of the trainer
VIII. Audience needs
IX. Training objectives
X. Types of training delivery and vehicles
XI. Instructional aids
XII. Assessing the efficacy of training
XIII. Feedback
XIV. Conclusion

CHAPTER 12: PROFESSIONALISM, ETHICS, INFORMAED CONSENT, APOLOGY, AND END-OF-LIFE CARE
I. Introduction

II. Defining professionalism
III. Professional ethos
IV. The professions of medical care
V. Ethical practices for medical professionals
VI. Patient needs
VII. Professionalism and end-of-life issues
VIII. Organ Donation
IX. Informed consent
X. Informed consent in action
XI. Problems in the informed consent process
XII. Legal implications of informed consent
XIII. Types of informed consent
XIV. Apology
XV. Philosophical perspective of apology
XVI. The behavior of apology
XVII. Legal perspectives of apology
XVIII. Conclusion

CHAPTER 13: COMMUNICATION AND MENTAL HEALTH: THE ROLE OF TALK IN PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL BEING VIA TELEMEDICINE AND TELEHEALTH
I. Introduction
II. How the pandemic changed mental healthcare delivery (telehealth/telemedicine)
III. E-therapy/telemedicine/telehealth
IV. What is telemedicine/telehealth?
V. The practice of mental health counseling and use of telemedicine/telehealth before COVID-19
VI. The practice of mental health counseling and use of telemedicine/telehealth during COVID-19
VII. E-training in mental health counseling
VIII. E-patient perspectives
IX. Developing rapport and therapeutic alliances with the E-patient
X. Patient and provider satisfaction with telemedicine/telehealth in mental health
XI. Federal changes to telemedicine/telehealth policy
XII. Fee for service healthcare system
XIII. Expanding telemedicine/telehealth access
XIV. Health insurance portability and accountability act (HIPPA)
XV. Ethical considerations
XVI. Is telemedicine/telehealth here to stay?
XVII. Conclusion

CHAPTER 14: MEDICAL COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY: CURRENTS AND FUTURES
I. Introduction
II. Electronic records
III. Complications of EMR/HER
IV. Legal implication
V. Other technological factors in healthcare communication
VI. E-patients
VII. E-training
VIII. E-therapy
IX. Mobile technology
X. SMART technology
XI. Social media
XII. Credibility and misinformation about health online
XIII. Biometrics
XIV. Telehealth
XV. Robotics in healthcare delivery
XVI. The future of healthcare communication: Concluding thoughts
XVII. Conclusion

Theodore A Avtgis

Theodore A. Avtgis (Ph.D., Kent State University, 1999) is President of Medical Communication Specialists (MCS), a consulting firm that focuses on communication training and development efforts for medical personnel and first responders. He has published dozens of peer-reviewed research articles, thirteen books, twenty-two book chapters, and dozens of professional presentations. His research focuses on health communication, risk and crisis communication, and aggressive communication.

Kevin Wright

Kevin B. Wright (PhD, University of Oklahoma, 1999) is a professor in the Department of Communication at George Mason University. His main research interests include social media and health campaigns, online health information–seeking behaviors, online social support and health outcomes, and stress and burnout among healthcare workers.

Veronica Nuzzolo

Medical Communication: Defining the Discipline is an extraordinary book! I have only had time to tear the cellophane off and thumb through it, but I can tell you with certainty that it is going to be one of the most helpful books in my collection.
Valerie Evans Minor MSN, RN, Alderson-Broaddus College 

Medical Communication: Defining the Discipline deserves a place on the bookshelf of everyone in health care – nurses, physicians, administrators, and those shaping its future. As a reference, it should become well worn and treasured!
David Kappel, MD, FACS, West Virginia State Trauma System

Medical Communication: Defining the Discipline represents a much needed and landmark work on medical communication. The text fully integrates the most important communication concepts into a context where effective communication is of the utmost importance.
Andrew S. Rancer, Ph.D., University of Akron

Medical Communication: Defining the Discipline is an excellent primer on medical communication that provides information that is both practical and thought provoking. It is an excellent foundational text for anyone who is pursuing or considering a career in healthcare.
Valerie B. Satkoske, MSW, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh

Medical Communication: Defining the Discipline is aimed at giving health care professionals a better understanding of the discipline of communication, its scientific basis and its practice. It is illustrated with examples of good and not so good communication behavior.
Thomas R. Gadacz, MD, FACS, Medical College of Georgia